Contact WAO | e-News Sign Up | Site Map | Home  
World Allergy Organization
WAO's mission: To be a global resource and advocate in the field of allergy, advancing excellence in clinical care through education, research and training as a world-wide alliance of allergy and clinical immunology societies.

Ask The Expert

May 5, 2014

Constant Itchy Throat with Cough

Question

I have a case to present. A woman who is 62 years old complained of constant itchy throat for many years. She tried many kinds of antihistamine drugs without good effect. I can't find any environmental factors influencing her disease. She has been to Australia without a change in symptoms. The SPT showed negative results. I prescribed 1st generation and 2nd generation antihistamines for her without good effect. I can't explain it. She does not have asthma nor allergic rhinitis, etc. She coughs sometimes because of the itching.

Answers

From the Editors: Allergists around the world are often presented with “constant itchy throat and cough” as a problem. Our two experts provide answers to this common scenario which allow each of us to brush up on an educated and formal approach to resolving it.

From Dr Mandel Sher, Editor: In this case of chronic, unresponsive throat itch and cough, it suggests a non-anatomic etiology (however LPR is still a possiblility) with neurogenic hyper-responsiveness that is commonly seen in chronic idiopathic/refractory/recalcitrant cough.  In this case, trials of amitryptylline or gabapentin should be considered.

By Prof Giovanni Passalacqua

The causes of itchy throat with cough (especially if long-lasting) are multiple. I suppose that asthma has been properly excluded by means of spirometry, nonspecific bronchial challenge (methacholine) or bronchodilation, and angiotensin converting inhibitors are not taken.

Read the entire answer

By Dr. Desiree Larenas-Linnemann and Dr. Gary Stadtmauer  

Reviewing, we have a 62 year-old patient with a chronic complaint of an itchy throat and some cough that does not seem to improve with a change in environment nor with anti-histamines.

There are a few key elements and questions to think about regarding this patient's history. The first is the patient's age which suggests that the problem may not be atopy.

Read the entire answer


Back to Question & Answer list

Note: Please read disclaimer. Ask the Expert is for licensed physicians only.