Contact WAO | e-News Sign Up | Site Map | Home  
World Allergy Organization
WAO's mission: To be a global resource and advocate in the field of allergy, advancing excellence in clinical care through education, research and training as a world-wide alliance of allergy and clinical immunology societies.

Stephen Holgate CBE BSc, MB BS, MD, DSc

Stephen Holgate is Treasurer and Executive Board Member of the World Allergy Organization. He is the Medical Research Council Clinical Professor and Honorary Consultant Physician at the University of Southampton National Health Service Trust in the UK. After graduating in Medicine from Charing Cross Hospital Medical School, Prof Holgate completed his postgraduate training in respiratory and internal medicine at the London Postgraduate Hospitals and Southampton Hospitals. From 1978-80 he was an MRC Travel Fellow in Allergy and Immunology with Dr K Frank Austen, Harvard Medical School.

Professor Holgate has served on a number of UK Government Advisory Committees in the field of Air Pollution, Hazardous Chemicals in the environment and Food Safety including being a Special Advisor to two House of Lords Select Committees on Science and Technology and has chaired the UK MRC Population Systems Medicine Board. He has been appointed to Chair Main Panel A of REF2014 assessing all research quality and impact in UK Universities covering medical, biological and health sciences, chairs the MRC Panel assessing grants in stratified and experimental medicine. In Europe, he has just been appointed to the Medical Science Committee of Science Europe. He was President of the BSACI and British Thoracic Society.  He has received the King Faisal International Prize in Medicine, the EAACI Paul Ehrlich Award for Research and the Bill Frankland Award for Services to Allergy

Professor Holgate’s research has focused on the cellular and mediator mechanisms of asthma using a wide range of methods. His achievements have been placing inflammation at the centre of asthma pathobiology, the discovery of viruses as the major cause of exacerbations, the identification of the first novel asthma gene (ADAM33) and the key role the epithelium plays in orchestrating inflammatory and remodeling responses in asthma.